blog cover photo of post titled what is cervicogenic dizziness

Dizziness is a common complaint at clinics like ours. People suffer from dizziness for several reasons. One common cause is something called cervicogenic dizziness. Simply put – cervicogenic dizziness originates from the cervical spine.

In other words, our upper neck can be the cause of dizziness!

First described in 1955, cervicogenic dizziness is disequilibrium that is associated with neck pain in patients with abnormal afferent (or sensory) activity form the neck [4].

What Causes Cervicogenic Dizziness?

There are three common theories attempting to explain cervicogenic dizziness.

  1. Vascular compression.
  2. Altered proprioceptive input.
  3. Vasomotor changes caused by irritation of the cervical sympathetic chain.

Cervicogenic dizziness is usually caused by impact such as whiplash or spasm of the cervical muscles.

How is Cervicogenic Dizziness Assessed and Diagnosed?

Firstly, there is no blood test, imaging or specific testing that can diagnose cervicogenic dizziness. The assessment with your chiropractor or physiotherapist is most important.

At Absolute Health and Wellness, our initial assessments are 1 hour long – to ensure a thorough, comprehensive workup is done.

Our practitioners will assess your neck and back range of motions and joint restrictions. They will assess your neck musculature along with nerves and muscle through myotome and dermatome testing.

How Can Cervicogenic Dizziness be Treated?

Various studies have demonstrated that manual therapy, like that performed by our physiotherapists and chiropractors can improve dizziness [1]. There has been specific research on those with neck pain – and found spinal manipulation, mobilizations and soft tissue work can be of great help [2].

Treating Cervicogenic Dizziness at Absolute Health and Wellness

Cervicogenic dizziness can be assessed and treated by a number of us at Absolute Health and Wellness. Click here to learn more about our team and see how they may be of assistance.

References

[1] C. Hawk, R. Rupert and M. Colonvega, "Chiropractic Care for Older Adults at Risk for Falls: A Preliminary Assessment.," Journal of the American Chiropractic Association ., vol. 42, no. 7, pp. 10-18, 2005. [https://web.a.ebscohost.com/abstract?direct=true&profile=ehost&scope=site&authtype=crawler&jrnl=10817166&AN=18471601&h=A0H0qktdM4sIsXia0mt%2fzZ8g6KbeY%2bFTestnCJ%2fyrJ%2bgl91EEZoOHSnI8DZNf9OQ5JoNfqxcJuijT28hZIanAA%3d%3d&crl=c&resultNs=AdminWebAuth&.

[2] R. Lystad, G. Bell and C. Carter, "Manual therapy with and without vestibular rehabilitation for cervicogenic dizziness: a systematic review," Chirop Man Therap, vol. 19, no. 1, p. 21, 2011. [https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21923933/].

[3] H. Ndetan, C. Hawk, V. Ka Sekhon and M. Chisano, "The Role of Chiropractic Care in the Treatment of Dizziness or Balance Disorders: Analysis of National Health Interview Survey Data," J Evid Based Complementary Altern Med, vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 138-42, 2016. [https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26362851/].

[4] A. Chaibi and P. Tuchin, "Chiropractic spinal manipulative treatment of cervicogenic dizziness using Gonstead method: a case study," J Chiropract Med, vol. 10, no. 3, pp. 194-198, 2011. [https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3259942/].

[5] A. Norregaard, H. Lauridsen and J. Hartvigsen, "Chiropractic management of a patient with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: a case report," J Manipulative Physiol Ther, vol. 32, no. 5, pp. 387-90, 2009. [https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19539122/].

[6] R. Bryans, M. Sescarreaux and M. Duranleau, "Evidence-based guidelines for the chiropractic treatment of adults with headache," J Manipulative Physiol Ther, vol. 34, no. 5, pp. 274-89, 2011. [https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21640251/].

[7] A. Gross, J. Miller, J. D'Sylva, S. Burnie and C. Goldsmith, "Manipulation or mobilisation for neck pain: a Cochrane Review," Cochrane Review: Manual Therapy, vol. 15, no. 4, pp. 315-33, 2010. [https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20510644/].

[8] J. Zhang, "Chiropractic adjustments and orthotics reduced symptoms for standing workers," J Chirop Med, vol. 4, no. 4, pp. 177-81, 2005. [https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2647045/].

About the Author - Dr. Johann de Chickera

Dr. Johann de Chickera is a naturopath at Absolute Health and Wellness in Paris Ontario

Dr. Johann is a licensed naturopathic doctor and co-owner of Absolute Health and Wellness. He completed his 4-year degree at the Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine (CCNM). His clinical focus lies in chronic disease, such as those related to the Gastrointestinal, Endocrine, and Immune Systems.

His approach to medicine relies on working with the patient to come up with a feasible, multi-factorial approach that addresses all complaints at once. He employs a strong background in diagnostic medicine and human physiology and pathology to diagnose and treat. His treatment involve a combination of nutritional counselling, botanical medicine, eastern medicine (acupuncture), nutraceutical supplementation and hands on physical medicine.

To book in please call us at (519) 442-2206 or click here.

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